12 reasons I’m tempted to drop everything and move to Grenada

I’m in Toronto daydreaming about living in a beach cottage in Grenada.  A year ago I would have been hard-pressed to find the island on a map– it was one of the mysterious “G” countries near the equator such as  Guyana or Guadeloupe. But after spending some time criss-crossing the island researching a culinary story for Taste & Travel Magazine (watch for it Summer 2015), it seems I’ve caught “Move to Grenada” fever.

Hiking in Grenada

It’s easy to catch “Move to Grenada” fever

What’s especially strange is that we already have a beach home in Mexico. But Grenada has many of the same qualities I love about Puerto Escondido–plus a few extras. This unspoiled  island in the southeastern Caribbean Sea has plenty to offer those dreaming of a tropical retirement destination, a long term vacation or a place to reinvent themselves. Here are a few reasons I’m tempted to drop everything and escape to Grenada:

1. Beautiful beaches: When I came up with my original wish-list for retirement living, a long beach for walking was near the top of the list. And, there’s plenty to choose from in Grenada and its sister islands of Carriacou and Petite Martinique.  Located at the southern tip of the Windward Islands, Grenada counts among its 40+ white sand beaches stunners such as Pink Gin beach, the aptly-named Aquarium Beach and the sparkling  Grand-Anse beach, all which come with strategically-placed almond, mango and ficus shade trees. Even during the peak holiday period in mid-February, the beaches were free of crowds.

Beautiful Grand Anse Beach is 2.5 miles long and perfect for swimming

Beautiful Grand Anse Beach is 2.5 miles long and perfect for swimming or lounging under an almond tree

2. Admirable Safety Record: According to the World Bank and the United Nations, Grenada’s  intentional homicide rate ranged from 4 to 13 (per 100,00 people) between 2010 and 2012. This makes it safer than the Bahamas ( 30), Belize (45), Dominican Republic and Mexico (22), Honduras (a whopping 90), Jamaica (39), St. Kitts ( 45) and on par with Costa Rica (9) and the United States (4).  It’s well ahead of where our family ranch is in Guatemala (30). According to the Official Visitors Guide, the 5 Top Dangers in Grenada include sun burn and falling coconuts. Oh, a beach apple that can give you a rash. I think I can handle that.

Paradise Beach Carriacou

3. Big ex-pat community: Some  countries in the world just resonate with you…they’re places you feel instantly at home.  I may have been been influenced by the fact that my hosts were all returned Grenadians  (that’s you Renee and Roger) or ex-pats such as a Canadian ( yay  Jennifer),  lots of Brits, a backpacker from Germany who never left and  Sally who opened a juice bar on Carriacou, population of just 6,000 people. Or it could have been that I kept bumping into a film crew from House Hunters International. Or, that English is the official language and you can drink the water. But I got the impression that Grenada is an island that hasn’t yet been discovered by everyone. And those who have discovered it, love their piece of paradise.

Annie's Kayak Kafe & Juice Bar, Hillsborough, Grenada

Sally’s Kayak Kafe & Juice Bar, Hillsborough, Grenada

4.  Fresh Food and Cookouts: If Grenadians aren’t talking about what they’re planning to eat or cook, then they’re talking about their home gardens. The Spice Island is the proverbial Garden of Eden when it comes to growing plants. “Drop a seed in the ground and it grows,” said my driver in Carriacou. On Grenada’s Independence Day, I saw men harvesting callalo leaves the size of yoga mats to make Oil Down, the traditional beach stew cookout (a deliciously rich concoction of coconut milk, vegetables, chicken and spices). Sure, there are lots of other  beautiful Caribbean islands but many rely on imported vegetables.  I loved Turks and Caicos, but paying $3 USD for one avocado in the supermarket isn’t a viable option if you’re married to a Latino who eats them for breakfast, lunch and dinner.  In Grenada, you just grow your own or shop the roadside stalls or St. George’s market.  There’s papaya, custard apples, shadow-beni ( an herb like cilantro), breadfruit, limes, golden apples – well you get the idea.

Spices in the market St George's Town Grenada

Spices in the market St George’s Town Grenada

5. Authentic Local cuisine: Whether you’re talking small roadside eateries or fine-dining,  you can be sure you’ll be enjoyed authentic, locally-sourced food. Apart from a KFC or two ( and the Colonel is practically a Member of Parliament) there’s nary a multinational chain in sight. They even have a West Indies Brewing Co, the only microbrewery in the eastern Caribbean. And there’s lots of lobster too.

A traditional lunch with grilled fish and nutmeg sauce, stewed pumpkin and callaloo in Grenada

Yum! A traditional lunch with grilled fish and nutmeg sauce, stewed pumpkin and callaloo in Grenada

6. Properties with a view: Location, location, location. Thanks to all the hills, almost every property enjoys stunning views. And you can find some bargains. Pure Grenada offers a screened  listing of guest houses, apartments and villas for short and long term rent whether you’re looking for luxury (check out the posh Pool Suites at The Calabash) or on a budget. Lance Aux Epines cottages, on one of the prettiest beaches, offers housing from $488 USD per person a month.

View of Prickly Bay at Calabash Hotel and Villas

View of Prickly Bay at Calabash Hotel and Villas

7. Orderly and clean: I counted nine hospitals/clinics so health care seems accessible, important for this aging body. it’s also a tidy place. Even after the Independence  Day bash-up I didn’t see any garbage on the streets. But Grenada’s not too prim or overly organized. I loved very proper Bermuda but couldn’t see myself living there.

View of St. George's Town Grenada

No garbage here! View of St. George’s Town, Grenada

8. Land of Opportunity: How easy is it for a foreigner to buy real estate in Grenada? If you’re interested in buying property in Grenada, you must first apply to the government for a licence under the Alien’s Land Holding ordinance. According to the Official Visitors Handbook, this process requires “little documentation” such as police clearance and bank reference etc. and there’s a fee of 10% on the value of the land, land transfer tax (10-15%) and something called Stamp Duty.  The biggest challenge would seem to be finding a property to buy as “For Sale” signs are few and far between. Want to open a business? Investing in Grenada is done via the Grenada Industrial Development Corporation.  Qualifying businesses include tourism investment (hotels, villas), agriculture ( spice-farming, organic production) and the creative  industry (photography, magazine publishing and art).

Fixer-upper house on Carriacou

Fixer-upper house on Carriacou Island – No For Sale sign but one can dream.

9. Rich culture: With music, literature and events that involve all-ages, you’ll never be bored in Grenada. Between the Parang Festival at Christmas, Carnival  in February/March, boat launchings and tombstone feasts at the family grave sites, it seems Grenadians celebrate as often as Mexicans do.  There’s even Big Drum Dance, a traditional African dance, calypso street parties,  boat regattas and “liming”, which is the art of doing nothing. There’s also plenty of culinary culture. Locals are as passionate about their favourite roti or doubles stand as they are about the national flag.  Doubles are a street food made with fried bread stuffed with channa (curried chick peas). An order of  doubles at My Place Roti Stand in Grenville will cost you around $20 2.5 XCD Eastern Caribbean Dollars or $10 CAD so immersing yourself in local culture doesn’t cost a fortune.

Roti shop in Grenville Grenada

Stop for Roti & Doubles in Grenville Grenada

10 Heavenly climate:  Contrary to what you might think, living near the equator is not as scorching as it sounds. Thanks to the trade winds  the average year round temperature in Grenada is a balmy 23C. I actually shivered in the middle of the afternoon one day. Nice.

Lush vegetation in Carriacou

Lush vegetation in Carriacou

11 Eco-adventure: Best of all, whether you want to go hiking in Grand Etang National Park, swimming in hidden Honeymoon Falls or just laze on a beach, you’ll rarely bump into anyone else. One-ninth of Grenada’s landmass is preserved in parks, reserves and wildlife sanctuaries.   And this isn’t likely to change any time soon. In 2014, Grenada completed a major tourism rebranding project and the newly-formed Grenada Tourism Authority’s tagline of “Pure Grenada” is positioning the island as a Geo-Tourism Destination with a focus on sustainable tourism appealing to discerning travellers and adventurers.

Sauteurs Bay on the northern tip of Grenada

Undeveloped Sauteurs Bay on the northern tip of Grenada

Watch the beautiful Pure Grenada launch video here:

12. Easy to get to: It’s a five hour direct flight on Air Canada Rouge from Toronto to Maurice  Bishop International Airport (GND),  which is just minutes away from Grenada’s best beaches. JetBlue Airways just announced twice weekly direct flights on Thursdays and Sundays from New York’s JFK airport beginning June 11, 2015. And Delta launched new service from Atlanta.

Beautiful (and swimmable) Lance Aux Epines beach in Grenada

Beautiful  Lance Aux Epines or Prickly Bay beach in Grenada is just minutes from the airport

I’m  keen to learn more about this under-the-radar destination so I’m checking property listings and will definitely be watching HGTV’s upcoming episode of House Hunters International  featuring Grenada. Stay tuned for more details. You just might be seeing me on the beach.

Travel writer Michele Peterson at Paradise Beach Carriacou

Let’s go to Paradise Beach!

If you enjoyed this post, why not check out A Food-lover’s Guide to Grenada, a wrap-up of our top foodie picks of everything fresh, authentic and delicious on the island.

Travel Planner

Pure Grenada Official Tourism Site

Email: [email protected]

Grenada Tourism Authority Canada: 90 Eglington Ave East, Suite 605, Toronto, Ontario

Subscribe to my newsletter for upcoming posts on the hotels I stayed at (and recommend):

Calabash Hotel and Spa 

Petit Anse Grenada Hotel 

Le Phare Bleu Marina 



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Showing 57 comments
  • Donna Janke
    Reply

    You certainly make Grenada sound appealing. I was sold halfway through the list. I’m not looking to buy a retirement home somewhere, but I am looking for somewhere warm with a beach to spend a month next winter. Grenada hadn’t been on my radar, but I think it needs to be.

  • noel
    Reply

    Looks like a winning location for all the above and roti for only a buck, sounds great although that callalou, looks a little iffy to me 🙂

    • Ria R
      Reply

      Hi Noel, I’m from Grenada, currently living in New York and It is such a beautiful place. This post really hits the nail on the head but there is so much more to experience and explore. Calaloo is soo damn good it’s kinda like spinich but even better. You must taste it whenever you visit 🙂

      • Jack
        Reply

        I lived there for two years and really miss calaloo soup and lambi souce!

        • Michele Peterson
          Reply

          I love calaloo too. I’m looking forward to exploring the market so welcome any insider tips from your two years (!) in Grenada

  • Doreen Pendgracs
    Reply

    Oh, Michele. You and I are definitely kindred spirits. It sounds like Grenada is a dream location. I will definitely have to bump it on my list of places to visit, as I know there is a lot of cocoa being grown there and that makes it a “must see” destination for me! Thx for sharing your delicious pics.

  • Larry
    Reply

    Looks great, I have been thinking about Belize, but this is also a good option, although I didn’t find anything on the accommodations link, Lance Aux Espines, that has anything near $480.00 a month.

    • Michele Peterson
      Reply

      Hi Larry..thanks for stopping by! I believe they quoted that price per person (which is a bit of an unusual procedure to be sure) but I did see another one near Lance Aux Epines which was a very nice 2 bedroom, fully furnished, with cable and internet and utilities for $1300 a month. (http://www.grenadaexplorer.com/apartments)/ I suspect if a person looked around once you were there, you’d find even more. If you see any let us know!

  • Denis Gagnon
    Reply

    I am not sure about moving there, but you make it very tempting indeed! Thanks for a great post.

  • Yasha Langford
    Reply

    I’m not looking for anywhere to stop – I’d like to keep travelling for the rest of my life. But this Island certainly sounds idyllic for someone looking to retire somewhere absolutely fabulous. I will certainly tuck it away in my places yet to see…

  • Anita @ No Particular Place To Go
    Reply

    Well, you’ve placed Grenada on my “must see” list with this post! It sounds like a lovely place to visit and, with all of its amenities, a fabulous place to settle down in for a time. Easy living!

    • Paula Keller
      Reply

      Love your story. I am a century 21 realtor in Grenada and finding a budget rental plus a place to buy is easy. Just speak to me or visit my website www.c21grenada.com Grenada is a wonderful place to visit..

      • Michele Peterson
        Reply

        Thanks for getting in touch Paula…your website does have some amazing properties! A fantastic resource for renting and buying in Grenada.

  • Youssef Sleeman
    Reply

    As a born and bred Grenadian currently living here I was very pleased to read your article. A couple small corrections though, we have 2 Carnivals, one in February in Carriacou (the one you are most likely referring to) and the big one in August which is on the main land. Also doubles and roti while a favorite of ours is a Trinidadian dish. A roti can be had for around $10 ec or $4 cad and a doubles between $3 to $5 ec. In terms of crime I would tell you or murder rate is the lowest in the Eastern Caribbean but you still need to be sensible about things in terms of theft. I lastly you forgot to mention our chocolate, one of the brest in the world.

    • Michele Peterson
      Reply

      Hi Youssef…thanks for stopping by and for the corrections! Next time I’m in Trinidad I’ll be sure to keep an eye open for “doubles” as I’d love to have them again. I did eat “Bake and Shark” though so did get a tiny taste of Trinidadian cuisine. I need to devote a WHOLE article to the chocolate of Grenada – I brought home 20 bars from the Grenada Chocolate Company. Love the 71% dark – delish!

  • Kay
    Reply

    Now I’m homesick. You have listed all the things I love about my country. It is a haven. One of my favourite pastimes is hiking the coast or mountains with friends. Your article is great promotion for the country. I am going to post to all my friends.

  • Wandering Carol
    Reply

    I’m all for cook outs and coconuts, but keep me away from the rash-causing apples. Sounds like a terrific island. (She says as she sits with a blanket wrapped her shoulders.)

  • Betsy Wuebker | PassingThru
    Reply

    We need to spend time in the Caribbean. Grenada sounds like a terrific – and affordable! – place to start!

  • carol
    Reply

    Wow…certainly all the right reasons! Never thought of going there but now I know it should be part of a Caribbean exploration! Thanks.

  • The GypsyNesters
    Reply

    All excellent reasons for living on a Caribbean island. We found them to be true on St. Croix when we lived there.

  • Dave
    Reply

    Grenada should be kept secret

  • Jamie
    Reply

    After living in the south of Thailand and running a business, I keen a sense for what I’d like in my beach town and Grenada looks wonderful. I knew very little about it, so thanks for sharing.

  • Culture Tripper
    Reply

    Gorgeous photos of the beaches, Michele! Grenada is one of the most ‘swimmable’ places I’ve ever been and the food is one I’ve enjoyed most in my global travels. I’m intrigued that qualifying businesses include creative industry. Definitely going to check that out!

  • Pat C.
    Reply

    Last year I stayed at Rex Resort on Magazine Beach and it was one of the best vacations I’ve ever had for food, beach, everything. The people are great, very friendly, enjoyed talking with them. I went to the Friday fish fry at Gouyaves, it was a memorable drive. Judging from your pics, there’s plenty of Grenada left for me to explore, like Prickly Bay and Carriacou.

  • Colleen Friesen
    Reply

    Damn, that sounds fine. Maybe you need a partner in this next enterprise? Clearly I need to get to Grenada and check this place out. Thanks for the temptation…I think.

  • esperanza
    Reply

    Sounds like Paradise on earth. Amazing that the temperature is an average 23 degrees, a welcome change from some scorching tropical destinations. Sounds so lovely am tempted to head there right away

  • Sue
    Reply

    As expected yet another wonderful article, Michele . You are selling Grenada to us ! I love roti , beaches , hikes and spending time with you and Javier. However , having just bought the new house it won’t be happening yet.
    Will we see anything of you in Puerto Escondido ? Hopefully so !

    • Michele Peterson
      Reply

      Yes, I’ll definitely be seeing you in Puerto Escondido this year – I miss it ( and you ) already and the year has just started! Abrazos!

      • Jack
        Reply

        Michele, It never gets as hot in Grenada as in Puerto Escondido!

  • Kim Cox
    Reply

    I am from the beautiful Island of Grenada and it is everything she said and more. I can’t wait to visit again with my family this summer.

  • Judy Freedman
    Reply

    I’ve never been to Grenada but with your pictures and description and especially this cold weather, I wish I could get on the next plane out.

  • santafetraveler
    Reply

    Some great reasons to move there- not the least of which is they speak English and the food is good. And it’s by salt water. Works for me- but, I don’t do islands unless they’re huge like say Australia or Ireland.

  • Irene S. Levine
    Reply

    Given how well traveled you are, your endorsement speaks volumes!

  • Carole Terwilliger Meyers
    Reply

    What a lovely introduction to Granada and why I should go. I’ll take one of those cottages on the beach, please.

    • Sherri
      Reply

      Sorry Carole, It’s Grenada. Be careful, if you try to book a ticket, you might end up in Spain.

  • kay Dougherty
    Reply

    You make a compelling case! I was there nearly 20 years ago and wouldn’t have considered it (although I enjoyed the island) but it appears that much has changed for the better. If you move there you should be realtor to expats! 🙂

  • Sherri
    Reply

    Hi Michele, I am Grenadian living in Canada. I go home as often as I can but I always love when I read articles like this about my lovely Grenada. Dave, I totally agree with you. If I could, I would keep my paradise a big secret, LOL. Heading there for 2 1/2 months this summer. Cannot wait. I urge those who have not gone to make it a must to visit, you will love it too. I will be sharing this so everyone can take a read. Thank you so very much.

    • Michele Peterson
      Reply

      Hi Sherri…thanks so much for the nice feedback! As you can see I too loved the island (and am enjoying eating my way through the collection of yum chocolate bars from Grenada Chocolate Company I brought home). Enjoy your summer in paradise! Please report back with any insider tips you’d like to share.

  • Janelle - GIDC
    Reply

    Good Day Michele

    The Grenada Industrial Development Corporation (GIDC) will like to thank you for your very informative and descriptive article “12 reasons I’m tempted to drop everything and move to Grenada.” You have indeed provided just enough information to entice potential investors and tourists to our beautiful shores. Grenada is one of the Caribbean’s best kept secret; it offers a purity that does not only exist in the beauty of the island but also through its business processes and interactions with its people.

    The Grenada Industrial Development Corporation is the Investment Promotion Agency of Grenada charged with promoting the island as the ideal investment location within the Caribbean. As mentioned in the article there are investment opportunities that exist within the established sectors for investment such as manufacturing, tourism, tourism auxiliary services, agro-processing etc. and within the new and emerging sectors such as health and wellness, ICT, the creative industry, etc., further information on our services can be obtained from our website www.grenadaidc.com.

    It’s refreshing to know that you took the time to acquaint yourself with both the business and pleasure aspects of Grenada and marketed such through your article. Thank you very much for using your experience on island and for marketing Grenada to the world.

  • Joy
    Reply

    I am a Grenadian living in England and fell back in love with my home island when on holiday last year. It’s so good to hear a well travelled person speaking so highly of Grenada. I am going back to Grenada in August this year and hopefully I will be able to convince my husband that its where we should live in our retirement. Let’s not big it up too much as it needs to be our secret island.

  • Heather
    Reply

    Great story and photos! I would happily deal with an apple rash over -30 in Toronto!

  • Christine Curry
    Reply

    Greetings Michele ~ it was such a pleasure to meet you at Belmont Estate, home of The Grenada Goat Dairy! We were delighted you were able to taste our chevre infused in the “sweet potato moringa goat cheese bake” and sample our chocolate delight. Thank you with much gratitude!

  • Valerie Smith
    Reply

    I just got back from my third vacation in Grenada, and everything you say in your article is true! The people are just wonderful. It is also relatively easy to get around the island and explore. The island is so lush and the fresh fruits and vegetables are abundant. Strong rum…Guava jam… The beaches! The swimming! Grenada is my favorite vacation spot! (And I am telling everyone 🙂

  • Jessica @ Green Global Travel
    Reply

    Wow, the food and views alone are enough to make me want to visit Grenada! (Your photo of St. George’s Town is absolutely beautiful.) It’s amazing that this little island truly seems to have it all! I hope you are able to move here someday!

  • Morne Jaloux Apartments
    Reply

    What a great write up. I moved to Grenada from the UK just over two years ago and it is, most certainly, a very beautiful place to live. Travellers on a very tight budget should also check out apartments and rooms to rent on Air BnB dot com, you can find a cosy place to stay either very close to the beach or up in the hills with some breathtaking views.

    • Daisy
      Reply

      Another place to stay if you are on a tight budget, are Captain Harris Suites. They are on the main road going to St. George’s but the beach is only five minutes away. Prices start at US50 per day.

  • rolf hoschtialek
    Reply

    Hi Michele, what a lovely article about our wonderful tri-island state … well researched and equally well written. I travel quite a bit and always tell people I meet that I live in Grenada because I want to, not because I have to … https://www.facebook.com/trulydiscovergrenada?fref=ts

  • Shirley Martin
    Reply

    I just left Grenada and Carriacou in May. It was as beautiful and peaceful as she describes. My grandfather was from Carriacou and all 5 sisters took a trip there to meet family we had never met. It was absolutely beautiful. We all now want to retired and move there.

    • Michele Peterson
      Reply

      Lucky you! I wish I had a grandfather from Carriacou too! I was just reviewing my photos from there for an upcoming story and was reminded of how beautiful and peaceful it is. I’ll be back there in January so will definitely report back on what I discover.

  • Sandra
    Reply

    I’ve been to Grenada and loved it. Not sure if I could live there as it definitely felt like a 3rd world country.

    I went to the website to check the prices for this statement : Lance Aux Epines cottages, on one of the prettiest beaches, offers housing from $488 USD per person a month.

    I did not see anything even close to that price. How did you come up with that?

    • Michele Peterson
      Reply

      Hi Sandra..thanks for stopping by. Glad to hear you loved Grenada – I really hope it’s not going to feel like a third world country as you say as I’ve booked a stay for January and February! The cost for those cottages is based on per person on a shared basis so you unfortunately don’t get a cottage all your own. I did notice quite a few budget homes for rent on the Century 21 website and I plan to inspect some of those properties when I’m in Grenada. I’ll report back with photos and prices on what I find out. I’ll also post a review of the apartment I’ve rented.

    • Neill S.
      Reply

      I may be throwing a stone in the river here, but we are no where NEAR a third world country. This statement/term is one of the few that riles me up about people! Have you ever been to a third world country to know what it’s like? We are a “developing nation” listed as a medium-income country within the region. People kill me with their views of what a 3rd world nation looks like… They see the small wooden houses, and narrow streets that harken back to a time before cars; if it were France or Italy, you’d most likely describe it as being “quaint”. One of the reasons we aren’t as developed as some other countries is because of our topography. Do you know why places like, Bermuda, the Bahamas, and Barbados are more developed than we are? They’re FLAT. It’s more expensive to develop hilly terrain than a flat one. As for the houses, go to middle America, or Eastern Europe, or a great part of Asia and you will see trailers, small houses, and examples of homes that could be narrowly described as 3rd world. There are large, beautiful homes all over the island. There are people who are successful within their own realms and shouldn’t be gauged behind your fogged up metropolitan veiwpoint. I am a very Americanized, but yet, PROUD Grenadian, who wouldn’t want us to be “discovered” too much. I’d never trade my safe, beautiful, unspoiled little speck of land for First World status one bit. Come, visit, and enjoy the character that brought you there in the first. But keep your “developed” mindset back at the airport you left from.

      • Michele Peterson
        Reply

        Hi Neill. Thanks for stopping by and contributing your comments. The reference to Grenada actually being a “third-world” was made by another commenter…I responded saying I hoped it wasn’t. In fact, I agree that Grenada is NOT a third world country as defined by the UN. Grenada is advanced in many respects such as life expectancy, literacy and many other measures than other countries. Another good example is the health care system. Even the airport has a qualified nurse – something many other airports including Toronto Pearson – no longer have. I hope that helps clarify my beliefs. I can’t comment on the opinions of the other commenters. Unfortunately,they seem to have different viewpoints.

  • Anne Clark
    Reply

    I have never been to Grenada… but now I after this post I am absolutely sure that I want to visit this paradise on Earth! I am amazed how easy it is to go there and how wonderful the nature and the beaches are! I am planning to move to Venezuela for a year and if I like it there may be I will stay there.. Grenada also sounds amazing for me! I have always wanted to move and live abroad.. so I will try to make this dream a reality! Thank you for the post! 🙂

  • Zulu
    Reply

    Well not to bust your bubble, Grenada could be a very corrupt place where consumer goods prices change based on the seller’s outlook of you. Have you noticed that most Grenadians commenting here including me live in another Country. There are reasons why we flee.

    Resources are scarce and expensive. Taxes are very high and they are many. You see, a man who though he is a good mathematician (not calling name) went to the IMF and borrowed lots of dough, much more than the country can afford to pay back… some of it was… let’s just say some disappeared and big houses sprung up afterwards. Now the IMF are making demands by telling the government what to do, so the citizens are forced to pay up, hence the new “Various taxes” locals are complaining about.

    That’s where you come in… You’re the only ones spending real money, the so-called rich people in Grenada hoard their money. You however, have to setup a home and a life “BINGO”! Did I say the words Small Island? Clan mentality? You’ll discover what that means all by yourself. Well let me not poison the water, but more realistic information is always good.

    Grenadians are nice people, no doubt about that, but many of them are jobless, hungry and desperate so at some point your house will be their store. Deportees (from Canada, USA, and Great Britain) are shunned by locals, so you, having no ties through heritage, will be the victim of these criminals who CANNOT find jobs. Grenadians could be a very punitive people. The Island is 133 sq. miles and you will be seeing the same people daily. Grenada is more than beaches and fresh fruits.

    The good news is that the police DO NOT profile and harass white people. Unless you come across a police who have lived and endured life in certain countries abroad. Traffic stops are NOT based on race. You can smoke weed even though it is VERY illegal, just don’t do it in public. You can get drunk every day and even drive while drunk (no problem). Cocaine!? Don’t mess with that. No one will be on your side when the s**t hit the fan. Sex? It’s everywhere. Bad drivers? Pick a corner. I noticed you mentioned the homicide rate but what you didn’t mentioned was the number of unsolved crimes carried out by scary masked men with machetes or guns, and how many victims left with scars. The police solves many crimes but the (black) mask, man has always been a scary and elusive figure in Grenada.

  • Georgia S.
    Reply

    These are some very “reasonable” reasons ;). Loved your article overall – interesting and helpful. A lot of people will be tempted after reading this, I’m sure of it. Thanks for the amazing post! It’s definitely worth sharing and I’m doing that right away <3

  • Andrew
    Reply

    It is a lot of great information about Grenada. My wife and I are going to retire in 2 years and we would like to go for winter to Grenada. One of the articles is telling about expensive (compare to Canada) cost of living .We would appreciate any tips for inexpensive accommodation,food e.t.c. and possible way to contact Christian organizations that can use volunteers since we would like to spend some hours a week to work as a volunteers. Any tips? Please contact us [email protected]

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